Memoir:What My Heart Remembers

girl playing baseball
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Excerpt from the rough draft of my memoir. Please read and drop me a note to let me know what you think. Thanks:

Words matter. Teachers matter. The words that teachers say matter. Her nine words managed to quietly sustain me during the later, darker years after I left the comfort of her third grade classroom. 

“Don’t let anyone tell you what you can’t do,” Mrs. Nancy Bazemore clutched my trembling eight-year old shoulders, leaned down beside me and into my ears she whispered those amazing words. I had told her that I had asthma and my parents had said that I couldn’t run.

My class was playing a game of baseball and it was my turn to bat and I was afraid to run around the field.

“Don’t let anyone tell you what you can’t do. Now run!” She had told me.

I can still feel the sticky sting of tears course down my cheeks; I can still feel the exhilaration of running around that ball field in spite of parents’ warnings. I can still see Mrs. Nancy Bazemore, her brown 1960’s era flip curls, her pretty hands shoving me forward. Into that Georgia afternoon, on that playground, I had defied those words of caution that had debilitated me.

I am sure my parents only had my best interest in mind, but the truth was that it was my sister who had had the asthma and I was therefore assumed to have it, too.

That day, I somehow managed to survive my run around the bases. I didn’t die of an asthma attack as I had feared. In fact, all through my childhood I had been warned by my parents that I couldn’t participate in physical education class because I might have an asthma attack.

Might.

Well, Mrs. Nancy Bazemore took a chance and I did, too.

“Don’t let anyone tell you what you can’t do.” She spoke those few words, seemingly insignificant to her probably, but to a little eight year old girl for whom encouragement was something rarely received, her words made an enormous impact.

Decades later, my heart remembers.

Thank you, Mrs. Bazemore. I am eternally grateful.

 

Copyright 2020, Jenny W. Andrews

 

 

 

Published by

jennygracespoetryandcreativewritingtechniques

I am a published poet and short story writer. I have been published in SNHU's the penmen review. My poetry book "Life at the End of the Rainbow" is currently available on Amazon.com/books. My published name is Jenny Andrews. My book is titled "Life at the End of the Rainbow."

2 thoughts on “Memoir:What My Heart Remembers”

  1. Beautiful memory. I believe that teachers have a big impact on their students’ lives. They often do much more than teach. My mother always taught me to respect my teachers and I teach this to my children. Much gratitude for each teacher I had and much gratitude for you dear Miss. Jenny, always so patient and dedicated to your students. Thank you 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Kelly,
      Thank you for reading my blog post. Teaching is complex, that is so true. I will always remember the teachers in my life who made a difference and gave me the courage to pursue my dreams. I try to do that in my own classroom; I try to be an encouragement to everyone-just like Ms. Nancy Bazemore had been there for me.

      Like

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